The Nonprofit Technology Network – Get Your Org in Check with Tech

NTEN Side

NTEN Side (Photo credit: TaranRampersad)

At The Nonprofit Technology Network, developers aspire to create a world where nonprofit organizations can utilize available technologies with skill and confidence. NTEN is a membership organization with members who have a common goal – to help nonprofits utilize all elements of technology most effectively. Members of NTEN’s community share the belief that technology allows and encourages nonprofit organizations to work with a more enhanced social impact. Their focus is to enable other members of NTEN to strategically use available technology to help make our world a better place.

NTEN helps facilitate the exchange of information and knowledge within their community. Connecting to members with the intent to research and develop opportunities, educate others on issues of technology that may benefit their organization, encourage advocacy, and discuss remedies for technology issues that affect communities.

How Does Your Organization Use Data?

Check out this video to see if you are organizing your non-profit’s data effectively.

If you are not, you may directly benefit from NTEN’s help and system of community values.

NTEN History

In the late 1990’s, the tech sector in San Francisco was booming.  Many new tech companies and foundations wanted a way to help their nonprofit clients and grantees to operate more efficiently by utilizing technologies more efficiently. In order to meet this need, funders then hired ‘circuit riders’ who were formally known as nonprofit tech assistance providers. These circuit riders did everything from creating helpful databases to setting up secure computer networks within these organizations.

In 2003 the conference name was changed rom Circuit Rider Roundup to the Nonprofit Technology Conference, or NTC, to help better reflect the technology’s pervasiveness and potential, as well as to better reflect their increasingly diverse membership. As tech began to reach into the communications and marketing industries, it began to reach a bit further into the realm of development.

Today the NTEN continues to grow and lead the nonprofit technology industry.

If you want to check out the NTEN site, be sure to check out their  programs, events, and community pages.

NTEN is a 501(c)(3) organization.

Author:

@BasilPuglisi is the Executive Director and Publisher for Digital Brand Marketing Education (dbmei.com). Basil C. Puglisi is also the President of Puglisi Consulting Group, Inc. A Digital Brand Marketing Consultancy that manages professional and personal branding for Fortune 500 CEOs, Hedge Fund Managers and Small Business Owners.

Sources:

About Basil Puglisi

@BasilPuglisi is a Content Contributor and the Chairman of the Board for Digital Ethos. Basil C. Puglisi is also the Digital Marketing Manager for PMG Interactive. As the Digital Marketing Manager he provides oversight and support to Digital Campaigns, from Website Development to Search and Social Reach.

Long Island Goes Local: The Kioli Business Summit 11.3.11

Alison Gilbert's DBME press pass

Alison Gilbert’s press pass © DBMEi.com

As one of the original contributing authors and business supporters of Digital Brand Marketing Education, I received proof of my proudest accomplishment the other day in the mail, my PRESS PASS. I tried it out, wearing it around my apartment and even wanted to wear it to sleep on my pajamas. But reason overtook excitement. I decided to wait until this past Thursday, November 3, 2011 for its first official outing, the Kioli BUSINESS SUMMIT at the Inn at New Hyde Park on Long Island.

Kioli ID tag © Kioli.org

Kioli Exhibitor ID tag © Kioli.org

I am no newcomer to events such as this having attended tradeshows, workshops and seminars as far back as the days when the Coliseum (New York not Rome) was home to NYC tradeshows and the Jacob Javits Convention Center was merely a cruise ship sized dream for becoming the primary host to the world of vendors and buyers for many, many industries.

After four hours at the Kioli Business Summit, including my eating a delicious lunch, listening to seminars on ‘Growing Sales’, ‘Banking, Borrowing & Investing’ and ‘Social Media & Search Marketing’ as well as attending an on-going networking tradeshow, my tired feet insisted that it was time to call it a day.

The previously scheduled Happy Hour was canceled due to a wedding that took precedence over continuing our celebration of LI Business. The news of this came as a mixed blessing, relief to my tired feet but disappointment to my boundless networking energy.

What is Kioli? To quote the November 20th, 2008 edition of The Long Island Press, it “is a catchphrase. An acronym to be more exact. It is a philosophy and a movement. It stands for Keep It On Long Island, but it means many things. (Kioli has actually become a verb as well as an acronym. To kioli means,  ‘to keep it on Long Island’.

Kioli defined

Kioli defined © kioli.org

“It means keeping our money here where it cannot be manipulated by treacherous Wall Street investments. It pleads with consumers to spend money in local businesses that are owned by local residents. Businesses founded by investments made by Long Islanders that result in profits staying here and circulating through our economy. It is a movement that dreams of providing our children with affordable housing alternatives and productive skilled employment. It is a notion whose time has come and Kioli.org is where it resides.”

LI Press

LI Press Logo © LI Press on facebook

The Long Island Press, a free weekly Long Island based newspaper distributed through out the Island and dedicated to “informing, entertaining and educating the opinion leaders of Long Island”, is the founding member of KioLi.org. “In the fall of 2008 a handful of companies, both for profit and nonprofit, came together to form a movement called ‘Keep It On Long Island’ (Kioli) for the purpose of stimulating business in the local economy. In 2009, the movement found a home online at www.kioli.org. Today these companies are known as Kioli Founding Members . . . .”

They are Alure Home Improvements, Farmingdale State CollegeSchwartz & Company,  Sperry Credit Union, MCL Dental Lab, Cactus Salon & Spa, Men On The Move.

Since its beginning three years ago, Kioli has been busy, very busy with the business of keeping business alive and well on Long Island. This is a serious challenge due to both the cost of living to stay here and the fact that jobs are hard to find because businesses here have been compromised by the current economic crisis.

Long Island is no exception to the hit our nation has taken. But there is a palpable ‘kioli’ spirit in the air. It is my opinion that this spirit was well represented at the Kioli Business Summit. I felt the spirit present in the amount and types of businesses, nonprofit organizations and business people who define LI for me.

Photo-of-Items-from-Kioli-Summit

Photo of items from Kioli Business Summit © Phil Jacobs

As I collected dozens of promotional items, exchanged innumerable business cards, introduced myself and shook hands with my fellow business owners, I had the opportunity to experience and feel this spirit at work, in the flesh, for the first time. I realized the foresight and dedication the original founding member businesses had.

Most importantly, I came to understand how both consumers and businesses on Long Island must think and stay local in order for Long Island to survive. That is what ‘Keep It On Long Island‘ means. Everyone on Long Island has a stake in this.

Fortune 52 Event Oct 17, 2011

Fortune 52 Honoree Event Oct 17, 2011 © LI Press

Even a major national social media company, Constant Contact, that is not Long Island based has provided us with a direct, full time and in-person link to the heart of their products. Ellen DePasquale, was a Kioli Summit speaker  in the afternoon  and a Kioli participant, giving a seminar at SUNY Farmingdale (a Kioli founding member) in the morning.

Best of LI 2012

Best of LI Competition 2012 © LI Press

The Long Island Press, Kioli’s founding member, plays a huge part in ‘kioli’ daily. In addition to its weekly publication both online and on paper, it is host to and reporter of many local activities. It adds an extra spark to the mix with its ‘Best of Long Island‘ yearly competition and Beverly Fortune’sFortune 52‘ and the honoree events. Felice Cantatore, Executive VP, bears highlighting as well. When he is not representing the LI Press or boxing, he is the ‘poster man’ for Kioli. I see him at every LI Business event I attend. And I am sure he goes to many more.

With the ability to travel from one end of the Island to the other in under two hours (depending upon the traffic) and in seconds (depending upon the cooperation of the Internet, WiFi and 3G), Long Island is in the process of becoming one business community. Although it is comprised of two counties (actually four if you count Brooklyn and Queens) and countless municipalities, towns, villages and cities, those boundaries are fading and in my opinion need to continue to be replaced by a sense of one common goal, Kioli.

Nonprofits at Event

‘Giving is Good Business’, Nonprofit Organizations  at the Kioli Event © Phil Jacobs

Common concerns and cares as well as a love for the life that we have here on Long Island are partly what glue us all together. With the extraordinary assistance of skyrocketing technology, we are becoming one. Not only does Kioli serve to ‘Keep It On LI’, but these types of gatherings and movements also strengthen that intention and further the unification of LI into one local business community. Kudos to Kioli, its founding members, its present participants and activities, as well as its energy in working towards this economic lifesaving destination.

SOURCES:
Who Cares About LI?  Kioli Business Summit Announcement

Kioli Business Summit (Advisory provided by Google)
Keep It on Long Island
About Kioli
The Long Island Press
The Founding of Kioli.org

About Alison Gilbert

Through decades as an entrepreneur, I developed ventures in over a half a dozen industries including HEALTH FOOD | GRAPHIC DESIGN | BUSINESS PROMOTION | HOLISTIC HEALTH | DECORATIVE PAINTING | SOCIAL MEDIA | PUBLIC SPEAKING | WRITING. Eventually under the umbrella of ALISON*S ART, INC, they evolved into the dba MARKETING BYTES, a hybrid company specializing marketing small business using social media marketing and traditional graphic design services. Currently retired, I am focusing on teaching social media marketing graphic design and visual journalism. I can be messaged through www.facebook.com/alisondgilbert and tweeted @MktngBytesMaven and @AlisonsArt.

Philanthro-Tweet: Using Social Media for the Greater Good

Social Saturdays on DBMEi

Let’s face it, celebrities often abuse their rights of stardom and do stupid things that become broadcasted on every social media Website and news outlet. We don’t always care that recent Bachelorette star Ashley Hebert moved into her New York City home with her fiancé, that Kim Kardashian went bowling with her hubby or how Lil Wayne celebrated his birthday, yet these are popular topics that trend in the Twitterverse.

However, there are some famous personalities who use Twitter and Facebook for the cause of the greater good, like the CW’s One Tree Hill star Sophia Bush, for example.

Sophia Bush has been an active philanthropist for a few years now, dabbling in eight projects at a time to help save the environment. On her Crowdrise fundraising page, she shares her charitable life with the world, rallies donations and constantly keeps her fans up to date on her Twitter and Facebook pages.

Bush originally thought social media Sites were for people who just wanted to post irrelevant things (like how some people will write what they wore, ate, and how many times they went to the bathroom), but gave in on Dec. 15, 2009 and has amassed 407,765 followers since then.

The disaster that sparked her Twitter interest? The BP oil spill in the Gulf Coast. Here’s a video of Bush with her One Tree Hill costar/ real-life boyfriend, Austin Nichols from their visit to the Gulf Coast:

Bush dreams big; big enough to have raised a total of $92,181 for all eight of her projects combined. Those projects include: Team Nature Conservancy SF ($52,192), Run for the Gulf ($18,192), Global Green Gulf Relief ($14,067), Massai Villagers Need a Truck! ($2,529), Friends of NWHS-Global ($130), Meditation for at Risk Kids ($190), Art of Elysium Rocks! ($3,347) and Massai Wilderness Conservation Fund ($1,459).

If you think that’s a lot, just wait — there’s more. Bush created her own limited edition Water Bobble, which, with every purchase, 50 percent goes to the Nature Conservancy’s fight to protect nature. She also won the 2011 Do Something Twitter Award for her environmental activism against celebrities Ashley Green, Kim Kardashian, Ashton Kutcher and Eva Longoria.

Here’s a quote from Bush, written in September of last year article: “That’s the most exciting thing, that all of these people coming out of the woodwork and contacting me and joining the teams on Crowdrise are all people who genuinely want to make a difference. We have voices and we have the ability to act, and the ability to create change.”

Sure, she may get paid close to $100,000 per episode on One Tree Hill and therefore has the money to advocate so strongly for the environment, but she is only one person. It makes you wonder, what have you done to save the environment lately?

If you want to become one of Sophia Bush’s #LittleVoices, visit her Twitter account, @SophiaBush or personal Website www.sophiabush.com, for more information.

Sources:

Crowdrise: Sophia Bush

Water Bobble: Limited Edition Sophia Bush

VH1 Do Something Awards: Twitter

AOLTV: One Tree Hill Star Sophia Bush Talks Twitter and the Continuin

About Vanessa Canner

Vanessa Canner is a freelance writer for Patch.com and other Long Island publications. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from Adelphi University in 2011 with a Bachelor's degree in Communications/Journalism and a minor in English.

Digital Media Monthly

Text - DIGITALETHOS to 22828 to sign up!